Tag Archives: the entrepreneurial instinct book

INC Magazine: Day Dream Your Way To Success. Really!

By Monica Mehta.  What we can learn from Susie Crippen, who used visualization to quit her waitressing job, get out of debt, and build JBrand in an $80MM jeans empire.

For the entrepreneurial underdog, day dreaming with your eyes open can hold the key to realizing the seemingly unacheiveable. Your mind actually has a hard time distinguishing things you are doing now from actions you anticipate and memories of the past. That’s why visualization is so powerful. As you visualize yourself accomplishing a goal, your brain can’t really tell if you’re remembering something you’ve already done or planning for something you will do.

Read more at Inc.com

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MSNBC (VIDEO): Can Instinct Make You a Better Entrepreneur?


Plenty of entrepreneurs skip the years of planning, business school and still find success.  Is it a fluke or a different kind of formula? MSNBC Your Business host JJ Ramberg chats with Monica Mehta about her new book The Entrepreneurial Instinct and the role of instinct in entrepreneurial success.

OneThingNew: How to Take a Risk

Great story from OneThingNew.com on my upcoming book The Entrepreneurial Instinct (McGraw-Hill, Sept 14 2012) on how to take risks without the angst …

How to Take a Risk
By Kimberly Weisul

Sometimes, you just have to make a leap. And sometimes, you just can’t.

Monica Mehta always wanted to be an entrepreneur. She got her B.S. from Wharton, worked in private equity, and spent her free time evaluating business plans. “I felt like I had checked off every box to be an entrepreneur,” says Mehta, now a private equity investor. The problem: “Taking that final leap of faith…Risk-taking is not something you learn in school.”  Read more at OneThingNew.com

Why Music Makes You Happy

According to an article that appears in Discovery News (April 2011):

People love music for much the same reason they’re drawn to sex, drugs, gambling and delicious food, according to new research. When you listen to tunes that move you, the study found, your brain releases dopamine, a chemical involved in both motivation and addiction.

Here’s the basic gist:

  • Listening to moving music causes the brain to release dopamine, a feel-good chemical.
  • Dopamine-induced pleasure may help explain why music has been such a big part of human societies throughout history.
  • Understanding why people like listening to music is helping scientists understand human pleasure

Moral of the story:  Fix Monday, hump-day and Friday blues by incorporating a dose of tunes to your daily diet. The associated boost in dopamine will not only facilitate concentration, pleasure and learning but make you more productive to boot

Come on get happy! (I couldn’t resist)